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Does ZOE work? Here's what our latest trial results show | Prof Tim Spector and Dr Sarah Berry



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Live Healthier: 10 Tips To Live Healthier From ZOE Science & Nutrition - download our free guide: zoe.com/freeguide

We’ve been working for the past 2 years on a randomized controlled trial of ZOE membership.

Participants used personalized nutrition advice to try to improve their health — and the results are fascinating.

In today’s episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan, Sarah, and Tim ask: How did ZOE hold up as part of this trial?

If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to joinzoe.com/podcast, and get 10% off your personalized nutrition program.

Follow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe

Timecodes:
00:00 - Introduction
01:24 - Quickfire round
03:11 - Sarah’s first impression of Jonathan
06:09 - What is an RCT
11:45 - What is ZOE and how does it work
16:31 - What did the RCT participants experience
18:40 - Using cookies to measure blood sugar
22:39 - What is blood fat
27:55 - What happens once you’ve done your tests
29:12 - Recent dietary changes Jonathan, Sarah and Tim have made
38:55 - How are you guided through the ZOE program
41:29 - Control group vs ZOE group
45:44 - Results of the ZOE RCT
49:27 - Do other wellness products have RCTs
52:32 - Will the results be greater after a year of ZOE
59:25 - Does the ZOE membership work
1:01:43 - The difference between ZOE and other medical devices
1:03:27 - Summary and outro


Mentioned in today’s episode:

Epidemiology of constipation in Europe and Oceania: A systematic review published in BMC Gastroenterology
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2258300/

Recent advances in understanding and managing chronic constipation published in F1000Research
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6192438/

Human Postprandial Responses to Food and Potential for Precision Nutrition published in Nature Medicine
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8265154/

Microbiome connections with host metabolism and habitual diet from 1,098 deeply phenotyped individuals published in Nature Medicine
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8353542/

Postprandial glycaemic dips predict appetite and energy intake in healthy individuals published in Nature Medicine
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7610681/


Episode transcripts are available here: https://joinzoe.com/learn/category/podcasts

Is there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at [email protected], and we’ll do our best to cover it.
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Management
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